Standard Support Document for Nonprint Sources (texts)   REVISED 7/25/08
authored by Frank Baker, media ed consultant, fbaker1346@aol.com
(Note: this document was prepared for the South Carolina State Department of Education English Language Arts team,
in support of the newly revised ELA Standards. The document may appear on the SCDE website in a modified form.)

IRA/NCTE Standards for The English Arts
http://www.readwritethink.org/standards/
6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation),
media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

 


SCDE ELA Standards: Guiding Principle 8
An effective English language arts curriculum provides for literacy in all forms of media
to prepare students to live in an information-rich society.

SCDE ELA Standards: Guiding Principle 9

An effective English language arts curriculum emphasizes informational text that is relevant to our increasingly complex and technological world.

.

SCDE definition of nonprint sources:  Sources of information that are not primarily in written form (for example, pictures and photographs, television and radio productions, the Internet, films, movies, videotapes, and live performances). Some nonprint sources (for example, the Internet) may also contain print information.

Asking questions: One of most effective ways of approaching nonprint sources is by having students ask questions. It starts at the earliest of ages: “
Kindergarten students generate how and why questions about topics of interest. They understand how to use print and nonprint sources of information. They classify information by constructing categories.”  This is the start of critical thinking and critical viewing, both of which are part of what is now known as “media literacy.”

From Guiding Principle 8: “The skills of critical inquiry—the ability to question and analyze a message, whether it be textual, visual, auditory, or a combination of these—are a crucial element in literacy instruction. The production of visual media is also a crucial element enabling students to acquire and demonstrate an understanding of advertising, aesthetic techniques, audience, bias, propaganda, and intellectual purpose. Integrating into the ELA curriculum the vocabulary and skills associated with media presentations helps students develop lifelong habits of critical thinking.”


Recommendation: to help students understand how nonprint sources work, it may be helpful to start by first teaching students about photographs/images; then move to print advertisements which incorporate images; lastly on to moving images (commercials, TV, film) (Since visual literacy is a large part of the arts curriculum, you may wish to collaborate with an art teacher on helping students understand this concept.)

PHOTOGRAPH & PICTURES (VISUAL LITERACY)
Photographs, pictures and other images exist everywhere in the world of our students. From books, to magazines, newspapers and billboards, images are a big part of their world. What do we want students to know and understand about visual images? How do students derive meaning from what they view? Students should recognize that photos/images are texts too, non-print texts.  And like all texts, they need to be studied and understood for how they are created to make meanings. This can start in elementary school with picture books and helping students understand how images can be “read.” Photographers/image makers use a number of techniques to create pictures. Those techniques include color, framing, focusing, depth-of-field, perspective (point-of-view) and more. Viewers of photos/images bring prior knowledge, experience and more to these texts. Since photos can also be digitally alerted, it is important for students to be able to question images, much the same way as they do traditional texts.

Additionally, photos and other images can be catalysts to help motivate students’ writing.

Standards
Grade 3 Researching
Applying the Skills Inquiry & Oral Communications
3-6.2 Use print sources (for example, books, magazines, charts, graphs, diagrams, dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, and thesauri) and nonprint sources (for example, pictures, photographs, video, and television) to access information.

 

SC Textbook Correlations

Websites (Grades 3-8)

Teacher Texts (Grades 4-12)

Reference Articles

 

Visual Literacy & Picture Books: An explanation of how visual Literacy can be used to enhance classroom literacy programs
http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/bookzone/vislit.html


Reading Picture Books
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/669

Word & Image
(TIME Magazine teacher guide: the language of photography)
http://www.time.com/time/teach/archive/981012/text5.html

 

Introducing Photography Techniques: Some Basic Vocabulary for Teaching Kids
http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/activities/multimedia/photo3.asp

Critically Viewing Photographs
(SDE Lesson Plan)
http://ed.sc.gov/agency/offices/cso/standards/ela/CriticallyViewingPhotographs.doc

Reading Images (Chapter 7), from Illuminating Texts: How To Teach Students to Read the World, by Jim Burke, Heinemann

Photography: Media Sources (Creative Education) 2008


Reading Photographs to Write With Meaning and Purpose, Grades 4–12  (IRA)
http://marketplace.reading.org/products/tnt_products.cfm?Subsystem=ORD&primary_id=612&product_class=IRABOOK&action=Long

I Wanna Take Me A Picture:  Teaching Photography and Writing to Children
http://shopdei.com/amla/catalog.php?product=61&parent=

Literacy Inquiry and Pedagogy through a Photographic Lens
(
Volume 85, Number 6, July 2008, Language Arts, NCTE)


Show me: principles for assessing
students' visual literacy: artistic
elements were the focus of lessons
on reading and responding
to literature in one third-grade class.
(p 616, Reading Teacher, May 2008)


"Reading" the painting: exploring
 visual literacy in the primary grades.
( p 636, Reading Teacher,
April 2007)


Meeting Readers: Using Visual Literacy Narratives in the Classroom (Voices From The Middle, NCTE,  September 2006)



Visual Literacy
(p 60, Childhood Education, Fall 2005)


Media Literacy: Introduction and Brief Background

 

Teachers may wish to start by familiarizing older students with the general 5 Core Concepts of media literacy:
1. all media are constructions
2. media are constructed using unique languages with their own set of rules
3. media convey values and points-of-view
4. audiences negotiate meaning (different people see the same media message differently)
5. media are primarily concerned with power and profit 
(Source: Center for Media Literacy, http://www.medialit.org)

General text recommendation:
Media Literacy  Reading the Visual and Virtual Worlds (Chapter 13, pp 336-349), in The English Teacher's Companion A Complete Guide to Classroom, Curriculum, and the Profession (3rd Ed) Jim Burke, Heinemann

TeachingMediaLiteracy.com, Richard Beach, Teachers College Press

Introduction to Media Literacy (Elements of Language, HRW)
http://go.hrw.com/eolang/medialit/




Critical Thinking/Critical Viewing Questions Students Should Consider:

1. what do I need to know in order to best understand how this was created and what it might mean?
2. who created this (message) photograph? (authorship)
3. why is the (message) here?  (purpose)
4. in what ways might the image complement the text and vice versa?
5. who is most likely to see the (message) photograph? (audience)
6. what methods are used to make the (message) photo believable; trustworthy? (techniques)
7. is there something outside the frame I don’t see? (omission)
8. can I make any assumptions about this (message) image?
9. where might I get additional info not contained in the (message)  image? (research)
10. what does the producer/creator/photographer want me to think/feel?  (knowledge, understanding)
11. how might others see this same (message) image differently from me?

General text recommendation:
Asking The Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking (8th Ed.) Prentice-Hall
Authors: M. Neil Browne, Stuart M. Keely
Companion website: http://wps.prenhall.com/hss_browne_askingquest_8/

 

 


Standards
7.6 The student will access and use information from a variety of sources.
7-6.6  Select appropriate graphics, in print or electronic form, to support written works, oral presentations, and visual presentations.

7-6.7 Use a variety of print and electronic reference materials.

Grade 8 Reading
Understanding and Using Informational Texts
Standard 8. 2  The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational
texts in print and nonprint formats.
8-2.4 Create responses to informational texts through a variety of methods

(for example, drawings, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, and media productions).

8-2.5 Analyze the impact that text elements (for example, print styles and chapter headings) have on the meaning of a given informational text.

8-2.6 Analyze information from graphic features (for example, charts and graphs) in informational texts.

 

SC Textbook Correlation

Websites (6-12)

Texts (6-12)

Videos (6-12)

Visuals & Graphics, Interpreting
Elements of Language, 2nd Course (HRW) pp 785-786

Still Photography
(Chapter 12)
Elements of Language, (HRW) Media Literacy & Communication Skills,
pp 113-126

Information Graphics

(Chapter 10)
Elements of Language, (HRW) Media Literacy & Communication Skills,
pp 87-98

Examining Photographs,
p 580, American Pathways to the Present: Modern American History (2005, Prentice Hall)

Interpreting Images, p. 461, American Odyssey, The US in the 20th Century (1999, Glencoe-McGraw Hill)

Teaching Strategies: Photography Project
(part of the series Teaching Multicultural Literature)
http://www.learner.org/channel/workshops/tml/workshop8/teaching3.html


Reading A Photograph or a Picture
http://wwwfp.education.tas.gov.au/english/vislit.htm

Questioning Photographs
(a list of questions)
http://www.frankwbaker.com/questioning_photos.htm

Reading Photographs
(using questions to decode, evaluate, and understand photographic images
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/677

Reading Media Photographs
http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/newsmedia/polphotos.html

How Framing Affects Understanding
http://www.frankwbaker.com/framing.htm

Is Seeing Believing? (learning to question images) 
this site includes famous Civil War photograph and background http://www.frankwbaker.com/isb.htm

Photography: Be A Media Critic (Knowitall.org)
http://www.knowitall.org/sites/artopia/media/artcritic/photography/index.html

Sources for Photographic Images: Current News Images     http://news.yahoo.com

Documentary Photography & Film (from the series American Passages:
Unit 12 Migrant Struggle) 
http://www.learner.org/amerpass/unit12/context_activ-2.html

Library of Congress: photographic images from US History
http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/catalog.html

History of SC Slide Collection (Knowitall.org)
http://www.knowitall.org/schistory/

Caroliniana Collections (Knowitall.org)
http://www.knowitall.org/caroliniana/caroliniana.htm

 

Reading Images (Chapter 7), from Illuminating Texts: How To Teach Students to Read the World, by Jim Burke, Heinemann

Media Literacy  Reading the Visual and Virtual Worlds (Chapter 13, pp 336-349), in The English Teacher's Companion A Complete Guide to Classroom, Curriculum, and the Profession (3rd Ed) Jim Burke, Heinemann

Visual Literacy: Learn to See, See to Learn, Lynell Burmark (ASCD)
http://shop.ascd.org/productdisplay.cfm?productid=101226

Image Matters: Visual Texts In the Classroom
http://shopdei.com/amla/catalog.php?product=45&parent=

Teaching the Visual Media, Peter Greenaway (Jacaranda
Books, Australia)

Photos That Changed The World  (Publisher: Presetl)


100 Photographs That Changed The World (Life Magazine)
http://www.digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm_index.htm




Moments: The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographs: A Visual Chronicle of Our Time (Tess Press)

ETV Streamline:

Introduction: Photography and Visual Images   (00:54)
Segment from the series: Lights, Camera, Education


Other videos:

Documenting The Face of America (PBS special- airdate Aug 18, 2008)
http://www.documentingamerica.org/Home.html

American Photography: A Century of Images (text and DVD; Shop PBS)

Language of Photography (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)

 




EDITORIAL CARTOONS
Editorial cartoons, in newspapers, magazines, and on the Internet, are another rich source of visual material that students should be exposed to and understand. Like photographs, they can be “read” as visual texts in order to be better understood. Not only should students analyze (read) editorial cartoons, they should also be given opportunities to create (produce) them as well.  Author bias, prior knowledge, symbolism, parody, humor, irony can come into play and students can begin to identify these concepts via cartoons.

Standard
Grade 8 Reading
Understanding and Using Informational Texts
Standard 8. 2  The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational texts in print and nonprint formats.

From the standards: Students in grade eight read informational (expository/persuasive/argumentative) texts of the following types: essays, historical documents, research reports, contracts, position papers (for example, persuasive brochures, campaign literature), editorials, letters to the editor, informational trade books, textbooks, news and feature articles, magazine articles, advertisements, encyclopedia entries, reviews (for example, book, movie, product), journals, and speeches. They also read directions, schedules, and recipes embedded in informational texts. In addition, they examine commercials, documentaries, and other forms of nonprint informational texts.

8-2.4  Create responses to informational texts through a variety of methods

(for example, drawings, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, and media productions).

8-2.5 Analyze the impact that text elements (for example, print styles and chapter headings) have on the meaning of a given informational text.

8-2.6 Analyze information from graphic features (for example, charts and graphs) in informational texts.

8-2.7 Identify the use of propaganda techniques (including card stacking, plain folks, and transfer) in informational texts.

 

SC Textbook Correlation (6-12) Recommended Websites (6-12) Other Text Recommendations (6-12)
Interpreting Political Cartoons,
(many scattered throughout the text) Magruder's American Government (2005 Prentice Hall)

Editorial Cartoons, pp. 683;797 in World History: Connections To Today
(2005 Prentice Hall)

Interpreting Political Cartoons (various scattered through the text)
US Government: Democracy In Action (2006, Glencoe)


Up for adoption: 2008

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Editorial Cartoons) McDougal-Littell

 

Daryl Cagle's Editorial Cartoons  (see also Teacher's Guide) 
http://cagle.msnbc.com/

Robert Arial (The State newspaper)
http://www.cagle.com/politicalcartoons/PCcartoons/arial.asp

Analyzing Editorial Cartoons
http://712educators.about.com/cs/edcartoons/a/edcartoons.htm
    
Analyzing Editorial Cartoons
(pdf) Chapter 7 Persuasion
(Holt, Rinehart, Winston)
http://web.archive.org/web/20060902015226/http:/
go.hrw.com/elotM/0030526671/student/ch07/lg1407284_287.pdf

 

Cartoon Analysis Worksheet
(Library of Congress)
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/cartoon.html

Learning By Cartooning:
Lesson plans & links for teachers
http://www.learningbycartooning.org/

Using Editorial Cartoons to Teach about Elections  (Education World)
http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr210.shtml

Lesson Plan 
ReadWriteThink: Lesson Plan: Analyzing the Stylistic Choices of Political Cartoons
http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=923

 

Analyzing Political Cartoons
Chapter 8, pp. 179-183, from
Building Literacy in Social Studies (ASCD, 2007)


The Best Political Cartoons of the Year, 2008 Edition
http://cagle.msnbc.com/news/BookPromo/  (earlier editions also available)


Growing Up Cartoonist in the Baby-Boom South: A Memoir and Cartoon Retrospective (Kate Salley Palmer) Warbranch Press
http://www.warbranchpress.com/cartoonist.html

Dr. Seuss Goes to War: The WW II Cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel,
New Press (2001)

Herblock: A Cartoonist's Life,
Three Rivers Press
(1998)

Arial View, The State Newspaper (1990)
 

 


 

 




ADVERTISING: COMMERCIALS
Moving images, such as televised/streamed commercials, offer rich material for young people to study. They contain “techniques of persuasion/propaganda” which are also found in everyday life, not just advertising.  Every day, we are exposed to literally thousands of messages, many of which are advertising and marketing. From toy ads to political candidate messages, to car and food ads: all are easily accessible via television and the web.  These ads can be analyzed (read) and created (produced) by students. Like print advertisements, commercials offer teachers a chance to help young people better understand “media literacy” as well as the “techniques of persuasion/propaganda” and the “language of television ads.” If you have the equipment and know how, students can also be encouraged to create actual commercials. If you don’t have it, your students can still create their own scripts and storyboards.

Elementary Standards
Reading: Understanding and Using Informational Texts
Grade 5
Standard 5-2
The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational texts in print and nonprint formats.

 

Students in grade five read informational (expository/persuasive/argumentative) texts of the following types: essays, historical documents, informational trade books, textbooks, news and feature articles, magazine articles, advertisements, encyclopedia entries, reviews (for example, book, movie, product), journals, and speeches. They also read directions, maps, time lines, graphs, tables, charts, schedules, recipes, and photos embedded in informational texts. In addition, they examine commercials, documentaries, and other forms of nonprint informational texts.








 

SC Textbook Correlation

Texts (grades 3-5)

Websites (grades 3-5)

Videos (Grades 3-5)

 NA

The Berenstain Bears and the Trouble with Commercials (HarperCollinsChildrens)
April 2007)

Made You Look: How Advertising Works And Why You Should Know (Annick Press)  http://206.186.83.77/catalog/catalog.aspx?Title=Made+You+Look
also
http://www.annickpress.com/madeyoulook/index.htm

Advertising: Media Wise,
by Julian Petley,
(Smart Apple Media, 2004)




 

Buy Me That: How TV Toy Commercials Hook Kids (SDE Lesson Plan)
http://ed.sc.gov/agency/offices/cso/
standards/ela/Grades3-5ToyCommercials.doc

Food Ad Deconstruction
(learn how to read, analyze, deconstruct print ads from magazines)
http://www.frankwbaker.com/
foodaddeconstructions.htm

Lesson Plan: Food Ad Tricks (how food stylists make food look good for TV)
http://www.frankwbaker.com/
food_ad_tricks.htm


Don’t Buy It (PBS Kids) http://pbskids.org/dontbuyit

Streamline videos:

LifeSkills 101-Media Wise (Slim Goodbody)

Advertising (4:23) segment from Discovering Language Arts: Viewing  
This segment presents a student-made cereal commercial and analyzes the commercial's advertising techniques. A follow-up activity asks students to create a commercial about a food or clothing item they enjoy. (Teacher Guide Available)

Other videos
(available for purchase)
TV Planet
http://www.rmpbs.org/resources/files/programs/kids/tv_planet/index.html




Standards
Grade 6 Writing
Producing Written Communication In A Variety of Forms
6-5.4 Create persuasive writings (for example: print advertisements and commercial scripts) that develop a central idea with supporting evidence and use language appropriate for the specific audience.

Grade 6 Reading
Standard 6.2 The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational texts in print and nonprint formats.
6- 2.9 Identify propaganda techniques (including testimonials and bandwagon) in informational texts.
7-2.7 Identify the use of propaganda techniques (including glittering generalities and name calling) in informational texts.
8-2.7
Identify the use of propaganda techniques (including card stacking, plain folks, and transfer) in informational texts.
E12.7  Analyze propaganda techniques in informational texts.

 
Note:
items in red added after SCDE document was published

SC Textbook
Correlations

Videos
(Grades 6-12)

Websites
(grades 6-12)

Texts/Periodicals
(Grades 6-12)

Up for Adoption 2008:

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Star Wars- Episode III Ads) McDougal-Littell

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Daisy/America’s Back) McDougal-Littell

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Advertising In The Jazz Age) McDougal-Littell

ETV Streamline:
Advertising Images (4:24) segment from Discovering Language Arts: Viewing. 
Television and film are full of images meant to convey a viewpoint, through which media professionals attempt to appeal to people's interests and desires. Images of attractive people can be used as tools to sell clothing, beauty products, and athletic wear. (Teacher Guide available)


Ad-Libbing It (22:03)

Ad-Libbing It is an irreverent look at how advertisers try to hook young people on cigarettes and alcohol.

The Role of Television Advertising In Presidential Elections (1:10)

Skills for Healthy Living: Analyzing Media Influences   (27:35)

Understand how different media affect the way we feel about ourselves and influence the health choices we make.


English Composition: Writing for An Audience
(streamed online)
Program Title:
#17 Persuasion
http://www.learner.org/resources/series128.html
Available from ITV: (contact your media specialist or DELC operator)
Voices in Democracy HS Edition Program #10 Media & Elections

Other Videos (Online and Available or purchase)

TV Confidential
(Grades 6-8)
http://www.rmpbs.org/resources/files/programs/kids/tv_confidential/index.html


Selling Children: How Media Affects Kids (Connect With Kids)
http://www.connectwithkids.com/products/sellingchildren.shtml


Merchants of Cool FRONTLINE/PBS (streamed online) 
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/cool/


The Persuaders  
FRONTLINE/PBS
(streamed online)
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/persuaders/

Scriptwriting In The Classroom (PSAs, Commercials, News, Film)
http://www.frankwbaker.com/scriptwriting_in_the_classroom.htm

Print Advertisement
(HRM Elements of Language)
http://go.hrw.com/eolang/medscope/module2.htm


Techniques of persuasion:   
Deconstructing an Advertisement (Media Education Foundation)
http://www.mediaed.org/handouts/pdfs/DeconstructinganAd.pdf

Propaganda   http://www.propagandacritic.com/

The Language of Advertising Claims
http://sunset.backbone.olemiss.edu/~egjbp/comp/ad-claims.html

Analyzing Presidential Candidates TV Commercials
http://www.frankwbaker.com/media_politics.htm

Political TV Advertisement (HRW, Elements of Language)
http://go.hrw.com/eolang/medscope/module1.htm



Critical Television Viewing Skills

http://www.frankwbaker.com/critical_tv_viewing.html

The Language of TV/Film: (techniques of video production)
http://www.frankwbaker.com/tvl.htm


The Grammar of TV & Film
http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Modules/TF33120/


Semiotics & Conventions of Television
http://130.18.140.19/mmsoc/chapter5.html


Storyboarding 
http://torres21.typepad.com/flickschool/2007/12/storyboard.html

Create a Storyboard (Knowitall.org)
http://www.knowitall.org/sites/artopia/media/studio/storyboard/index.html


Blank Storyboard form:
http://www.frankwbaker.com/Blank_Storyboard_Form.pdf

Texts:
Media Literacy: Thinking Critically About Advertising,
 
Publisher: J Weston Walch   http://www.walch.com/product/909

Made You Look: How Advertising Works And Why You Should Know (Annick Press)  http://206.186.83.77/catalog/catalog.aspx?Title=Made+You+Look
also
http://www.annickpress.com/madeyoulook/index.htm


Identifying Propaganda Techniques in Political Ads
pp 175-178
Building Literacy in Social Studies (2007, NCSS)


Political Campaigns & Political Advertising: A Media Literacy Guide,Greenwood Press, November 2008
http://www.greenwood.com/catalog/GR4755.aspx



Advertising: Opposing Viewpoints  
Publisher: Greenhaven Press


Periodicals
(also available online):

Advertising Age    http://www.adage.com

Ad Week  http://www.adweek.com


Motion Pictures: Understanding the Language of Film
Students love the movies and for the most part can talk intelligently about them. But many students don’t fully understand that films are also texts, which need to be read too. Films are rich texts with many layers to study and appreciate. Even elementary students should be asked: how are films made? Film makers have at their disposal a number of technical/production tools that comprise the languages of film: cameras, lights, sound/music, editing, set design, etc. Students should be encouraged not only to analyze (deconstruct) films, but also to create and produce their own PSAs, videos, or films (provided your school has video production and editing capability.) Photo Story 3 (Windows) is free, user-friendly software that allows students to create their own productions by adding narration or sound to their images—thus making a “movie.”  iMac computers come fully loaded with easy-to-use movie creating software. If you don’t have access to software, students can still create scripts, screenplays and storyboards for visual productions. Students can also learn how to write film reviews.

Elementary Standards

Grade 3 Research
Applying the Skills of Inquiry & Oral Communication
3-6.2 Use print sources (for example, books, magazines, charts, graphs, diagrams, dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, and thesauri) and nonprint sources (for example, pictures, photographs, video, and television) to access information.

5.1  The student will read and comprehend a variety of literary texts in print and nonprint formats.


 

SC Textbook Correlation

Websites (3-5)

Texts/Periodicals (3-5)

Video (3-5)

 NA

Teacher’s Guide to Making Student Movies (Scholastic)
http://content.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=6758

How We Make A Movie
(Pixar Animation)
http://www.pixar.com/howwedoit/index.html


Media Arts Studio

(Knowitall)
http://www.knowitall.org/sites/artopia/media/studio/index.html

 

Texts:
Coming Distractions: Questioning Movies (Capstone Press: 2007 FactFinders Media Literacy series) 

What Is Art? Movies
Age Level: 04-08 
Barron's Educational Series (February 2004)
 

Film: Media Wise
(Smart Apple Media 2004)

Periodical:
Reeling With Words (Writing Magazine, Feb/March 2007)

Available for purchase

 

Making Grimm Movies (companion to From The Brothers Grimm series by Davenport Films) sixty-minute video divided into three parts
http://www.davenportfilms.com/pages/main_mgmpage.html


Standard
Grade 6 Reading
Standard 6. 2  The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational

texts in print and nonprint formats.
Understanding and Using Informational Texts
6-2.4 Create responses to informational texts through a variety of methods

(for example, drawings, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, and media productions).

Grade 8 Reading
Understanding and Using Informational Texts
Standard 8. 2  The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational texts in print and nonprint formats.

From the standards: Students in grade eight read informational (expository/persuasive/argumentative) texts of the following types: essays, historical documents, research reports, contracts, position papers (for example, persuasive brochures, campaign literature), editorials, letters to the editor, informational trade books, textbooks, news and feature articles, magazine articles, advertisements, encyclopedia entries, reviews (for example, book, movie, product), journals, and speeches. They also read directions, schedules, and recipes embedded in informational texts. In addition, they examine commercials, documentaries, and other forms of nonprint informational texts.




 

SC Textbook Correlation
(6-12)

 

Video Resources (6-12)


Other Book Recommendations (6-12)


Website resources
(6-12)

Motion Picture Photography (Chapter 13)
Elements of Language,
Media Literacy & Communication Skills
pp 127-136


Literature  Grade  6,7, 8 (McDougal Littell)
(pp 150-151 Media Studies: Plot & Setting in Film)

Literature  Grade 9, 10
(McDougal Littell)
(pp 130-131 Media Studies: Creating Suspense In Film)

Up For Adoption: 2008:

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Sister of the Traveling Pants; Whalerider)
McDougal-Littell

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Lord of the Rings; The Cask of Amontillado;
The Birds; Romeo & Juliet) McDougal-Littell

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapter: Apollo 13; Finding Forrester) McDougal-Littell

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media
(DVD Chapter: The Crucible; An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge) McDougal-Littell

Media Smart  Strategies for Analyzing Media (DVD Chapters: Camelot/King Arthur; MacBeth; Gulliver’s Travels) McDougal-Littell


 

 

 

ETV Streamline

The Power of Film; Visual Literacy two segments from the series Lights, Camera, Education (Background on this series can be found at the American Film Institute’s website:  http://www.afi.edu/intro/lce.aspx

Fear Factor: Film Techniques;
The Medium is the Message: Film Style and Subject Mattersegments from Discovering Language Arts: Viewing (Grades 9-12)

FILM: Media Wise,
by Julian Petley,
(Smart Apple Media, 2004)

How To Read A Film, James Monaco
http://readfilm.com/books.htm

How to Read A Film (DVD) http://readfilm.com/HTRDVD.html

The Director in the Classroom How Filmmaking Inspires Learning
http://www.thedirectorintheclassroom.com/book4.php


Filmmaking for Teens: Pulling Off Your Shorts
by Troy Lanier and Clay Nichols  Michael Wiese Productions

Girl Director A How-To Guide for the First-Time,  Flat-Broke Film and Video Maker, Ten Speed Press

Making Short Films
(includes DVD)
ISBN 1-58115-444-5 Allworth Press

Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts
(NCTE) http://www.ncte.org/store/books/124789.htm

Great Films and How to Teach Them (NCTE)
http://www.ncte.org/store/books/117911.htm

Reading In The Dark: Using Film As A Tool in The English Classroom (NCTE)
http://www.ncte.org/store/books/media/106296.htm


Reel Conversations: Reading Films with Young Adults
http://www.amazon.com/Reel-Conversations-Reading-Adults-Literature/dp/0867093773

Periodicals:

Student Filmmakers
https://www.studentfilmmakers.com/store/customer/home.php?cat=248

Total Film http://www.totalfilm.com


Script Magazine http://www.scriptmag.com/

 

American Cinematographer  http://www.theasc.com/

Screen Education (Australia) http://www.metromagazine.com.au/screen_ed/index.html

 

Teacher’s Guide: Academy Award Series
http://www.oscars.org/teachersguide/index.html

Film Production:
Be A Media Critic
(Artopia: Knowitall.org)
http://www.knowitall.org/sites/artopia/media/artcritic/film/index.html

Cinema: How Hollywood Films Are Made (Annenberg)
http://www.learner.org/interactives/cinema/


Lights, Camera, Education (AFI)
http://www.afi.edu/intro/lce.aspx  (also available via ETV Streamline)

American Cinema (multipart series/ streamed on-line)
http://www.learner.org/resources/series67.html

Documentary Photography & Film
(from the series American Passages: Unit 12 Migrant Struggle) 
http://www.learner.org/amerpass/unit12/context_activ-2.html


The Story of Movies
http://www.storyofmovies.org/


IFC Film School:  http://filmschool.ifc.com/index.jsp

Lesson Plan:
Lights, Camera, Action...Music: Critiquing Films Using Sight and Sound
(Read, Write, Think) http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=863

Scriptwriting In The Classroom (resource covers scriptwriting and storyboarding of PSAs, Commercials, News, Film)
http://www.frankwbaker.com/scriptwriting_in_the_classroom.htm

Writing About Film  http://www.dartmouth.edu/~writing/materials/student/humanities/film.shtml

How to Write A Movie Review
http://www.howtodothings.com/hobbies/a2206-how-to-write-a-movie-review.html


Movie Trailers as Persuasive Texts
http://www.frankwbaker.com/movie_trailers_as_persuasion.htm

Using Documentaries in The Classroom
http://www.frankwbaker.com/using_docs_in_the_classroom.htm

 

 

Note: the author maintains the Media Literacy Clearinghouse web site, www.frankwbaker.com at which teachers can locate additional resources/lesson plans/activities/books related to all of the above topics.